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I've been using imovie the last few years. Got a gopro 7 when it came out. having been shooting at 1080, but want to start to do more serious projects in 4k. The hevc file played back choppy in imovie. Did some research and learned The only way i can edit 4k @60 fps footage in imovie is to run it through a converter. settled on MacX Video Converter. The 4k video is converted to h.264. @60fps with a much smaller file size. it doesnt appear there is any loss of resolution. Is that possible? Also Downloaded the free version of Davinci Resolve 16 and with the help of a simple youtube tutorial was able to change some settings and view the original non-converted file smoothly in the edit window.

Also, what is the visual difference between 4k and 2k. I have no issues working with [email protected] video in imovie. If i am interested in working on short films/documentaries is 4k required? Btw I work on a 2014 Macbook pro. Here are the specs:
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I thought we had a choice for H264 and or HEVC.

4K you can crop, in edit and save in 2.7, 1440, 1080P with no loss to that resolution. the amount cropped, should be about 30%.

Youtube sharing there is no 2.7K so do you shoot and have your vid shown at 1080P..

I guess win is what I like then mac for that reason, and hope some one else can offer more then I given here. wait for @Ifti he is a mac user.
 

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The only difference between 4K and 2K is the resolution, and how much data is captured within the frame.
Naturally 4K is capturing at a high resolution, so the camera will need to work harder, meaning less battery life.

Also bear in mind your output - do you need to output in 4K? If so, obviously you record in 4K.
If you need to output 1080p, you could record in 2K, which means you can zoom into the image and still output a native 1080p, or in 4K, which will allow you to zoom in even further, or resize the frame to get a lot more detail into the output file. It really does come down to the type of projects you are looking to create, the output required, and where its been viewed.

Since the amount of data captured at higher resolutions and bit rates is so high, a new format was required that would allow for smaller file sizes, yet retain the high level of detail, hence HEVC.
Many modern editors can now edit HEVC natively - I use Final Cut Pro and import my video for editing as normal - no worries about file type at all. Although bear in mind to edit such large amounts of data with so much detail you will need a powerful computer.
Using a convertor to convert from one container to another will work, but you will lose quality doing so - which raises the question, why record at such a high quality in the first instance? Again, dependant upon your output goals.

I edit with this: Screenshot 2020-07-24 at 13.51.52.jpg

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